hollow-boned

1

2

The old kitchen
wanted for children.
No swing set,
no tree house,
no basketball hoop–
just a sensation of life–
huge and urgent.
The kitchen cupboards
quietly mind
standing hollow-boned
as a thought.

_______________________________

Trifextra Challenge: The challenge this week is to take 33 words from this page of Elizabeth Strout’s Olive Kitteridge.  I think you can take whatever 33 words in whatever order, but I decided to use this as another try at black out poetry, and keep my words in order. http://www.trifectawritingchallenge.com/2013/02/trifextra-week-fifty-six.html

I won second place!!! 🙂 How fabulous– Thanks, Trifecta Editors!!

Trifecta

58 Comments

    1. 🙂 Thank you! The first two lines just popped out to me and I went from there. I used my photo editing program and just drew sloppy lines on it, but any photo editor (even the free ones) could probably manage it without a problem… especially if you’re not trying to make it straight and artistic, haha! 😀

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    1. I’ve been fascinated with blackout writing since I picked up a book on it years ago. If you add the tag to your reader or search engine it, you can see some neat examples. 😀 Thank you for reading!

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    1. 😀 Thank you, as I started, I was worried I’d be writing the same thing as every other Trifectan, but the submissions were so diverse. It’s amazing what people can do with a small pot of words!

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    1. Oh my– no way! In my parent’s house, if you even step on a book or knock it off a table, you have to pick it up and apologize to the book. I can’t even dog ear the pages, let alone write in a book, let alone cross out actual words! 😀 Thanks for reading!

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  1. I did something similar once with cut out words… I can’t remember where I got them all, but it ended up being a very gothic poem…Let me see if I can find it. This is a fun entry!!!

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    1. Oh yes, look for it! I love cut-out poems and black-out poems. There’s something neat to the idea that there’s a poem in any ol’ bucket of words, if you’re looking. 🙂 Thanks for reading!!

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    1. It’s called “black out poetry” and I’m quite fond of reading it, though I’ve only experimented with writing it a few times. 🙂 It’s definitely worth doing a search for and checking out! 😀 Thank you for reading!

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  2. This is so unbelievably clever. To have created something so meaningful is one thing — but to have used the words in the order that you found them is just amazing!!

    Congrats on a well-deserved silver medal. 🙂

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  3. I’m glad that I got to see this! I wouldn’t have if it didn’t end up on the Facebook feed at precisely the opportune moment. 🙂 Go you. Congratulations!!!!

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