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My skin, a total Monet.

I could tell you the story of my weight in a sentence.  I’ve been chubby, thin, and average– and no numbers on a scale have had any impact on my life.  The story of my hair is a similarly simple tale.  It’s straight, brown, and does what it wants.

There’s no angst embedded in either story, no epic journey to the stylings of perfection.  It’s just weight, I think.  It’s just hair, I say.

Skin, though.

Skin is a different story.

Skin has been my odyssey.

I couldn’t write the story of my journey with skin in a single post.  There would be chapters on my acceptance of the color (from visual and social standpoints), chapters on allergies and breakouts, chapters on scars and damaged areas, and chapters on texture.   There would be pages about moles and what they mean, and veins, and the correct size of pores, and reviews of every fix-it on the market from expensive chemical compounds to natural treatments.  I would write chapters about being unable to wear clothes because of my preoccupation with my own dark elbows, visible hair pores, stretch marks, and discoloration.  I would have to explain how anytime I am asked to describe my husband, I start with the fact that he has beautiful skin as if it is his most prominent trait.

I remember holding hands with my parents as they held hands with each other.  My dad’s skin, flawless espresso, as smooth and as even-toned as a coffee bean.  My mother’s skin, pink satin, as soft and open as a peach rose.

I did not inherit this type of skin.

A good skin day. If you're me.
A good skin day. If you’re me.

My skin is a Monet.  From far away, or at a glance, I don’t think people notice.

When they look close, though, they see.

Freckles on brown skin.  Scars.  Breakouts. Oil. Dryness. Hives.  Moles.  Darkness next to lightness. Flaws.  I am covered in them.

It is a body issue, one that is mostly in my own mind, but one that is also true.  I can silence it for a bit.  This month in particular– in order to be able to cope with wearing a sleeveless dress, no nylons, and precious little makeup to my best friend’s wedding– I have focused on not being obsessed with my own skin.

But then…

coffeeroseToday at work a woman peered over the counter at me and asked if I ever tried washing my face with green tea, to “even it up”.

Five minutes later, I found myself in the washroom pressing bags of green tea up to my face instead of eating lunch.

So much for the silence of a mind at peace.

Green tea will be added to my regimen, and no doubt be another thing that fails the dream I’ve had since childhood– looking in the mirror and seeing the perfect skin of a coffee-colored rose.

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FishOfGold’s post about Appearances challenged me to call myself out on my biggest body issue.  Mine is not quite the same.  I can  look in the mirror and not notice.  Plus, I think I’m pretty enough– skin and all.

Body issues are always so much more involved than they seem though.  I teared up when writing this because it’s so embarrassing to be so worried about something so insignificant as my own skin– and because when describing my skin, I feel gross, even though I know better.  It’s a silly vanity and a trick of the mind.

But silly tricks can still keep you up at night, and even confident people can have a chinks in their armor.

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This week’s episode: A Total Monet

Current Cast

111 comments

  1. I really feel you on this one. I also have basically the same problem. A black father and a white mother both with great skin and I’m nearing forty and still get acne… Still, once I heard an interview with Shaq where he said that he was at peace with his inability to shoot free throws because that was God’s way to keep him humble. Otherwise, he’d be unstoppable. So I laugh at myself saying this was God’s way to keep me humble! I love your blog by the way, and it’s nice to finally see your picture there!

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    1. I had horrendous acne and unevenly toned “white” skin until I had breast cancer and the meds for that helped clear up the acne (but not the pock-marks or the uneven tone). Go figure. I resonate with the pain–and also with the fact of having to deal with well-meaning insensitive people who offer suggestions of how to “fix” the flaws. “Jennifer? Did you know you have spots?” Um no. Thank you for pointing them out to me. Put toothpaste on them? Are you serious?

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      1. Jenn– Acne is so random! Mine pretty much stopped when I gave up chocolate and sugar, but a tiny misstep and it’s back in full force. The pockmarks, though, who knows how to fix that! Well-meaning insensitivity is the worst because you can’t even get upset about it… haha. 😀

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          1. 😀 I do, too… it just feels mean to snap at someone who intends the best. My husband always says it’s good to inform them for the betterment of their future life and friendships… but I think that’s fancy-writer-talk for an excuse to yell at them anyway, haha. 🙂

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    2. 😀 Thank you, Sreejit! I love that concept, haha… it’s always good to keep ourselves a little humble. 😀 What a lovely insight– thank you for sharing it! 🙂

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  2. One thing that has stuck in my mind for years after a dermatologist said it to me is this. ‘the skin is a social organ. We use it to communicate.’ He also reckoned that severe acne, for example, damaged ‘not just the skin, but the psyche, and maybe even the soul.’ He was a wise man.
    The green tea woman? You should have told her exactly where to stick the green teabags, along with her teapot. Jeeepers, who does she think she is?

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    1. That dermatologist was so right. We do use skin to communicate. When my skin is at it’s worst, I feel like there’s a wall between me and the people around me. Oh well, it seems to get a little better every year… 🙂

      I like your advice on the green tea woman, haha! Not exactly my style, but I do appreciate the support. 😀 *hugs* You’re awesome, Duncan.

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  3. Such an awesome display of honesty – Way to share! We definitely all have our thing. I’m the same way with my weight. It’s always been my thing. I’d love to be able to talk about it so openly and honestly. This is inspirational, thank you.

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    1. I think once you decide to do it, it just starts. I realized that in smaller ways, I’ve been writing about my skin all over this blog. It comes up an awful lot, probably because I’m preoccupied with it. I have friends who are similarly worried about their weight, too… it’s a tough journey we each take! If you ever need an ear to rant about it, you know where to find me! *hugs*

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  4. One day maybe we will just love each other and ourselves – flaws and all- maybe because of our flaws- because we love unconditionally. I believe it is possible.
    I admire your honestly and heart.
    Namaste,
    Laurie

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  5. Loved your honesty Rawr – we all are picky little pumpkins when it comes to our appearance, I do not think there are many who are 100% happy with how they look or feel about themselves. Tis nature of the beast as they say – great Post hun.

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  6. I feel the same way about my own skin, flaw-wise. I have some acne scarring. I have weird bumps. I have strange discolorations. I suspect that my pores would never be considered “the right size.” Any time I look at myself too closely in the mirror, I wonder how on earth anyone could ever be attracted to me.

    It’s a trick of the mind, though- nobody looks at it as closely as I do. I think it’s the same with you.

    And for what it’s worth, I think the Valentine Michael Smith approach has merit- the variations in your skin are uniquely you. They are character traits, and they are beautiful- not flaws at all.

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    1. I’m the same with my list! But I don’t see any of that in any of your pictures. Maybe because you’re using a camera and not a loupe, haha. Oh, the mind. It’s a silly, tricky place to be. The funny/strange thing is that the things most people see wrong with my skin are the things I don’t worry about– like my scars. The little one on the bridge of my nose? It reminds me of my baby brother and to have patience with brilliance. In my jobs, and being married to Dave, I have to run my finger over it quite often, haha. 🙂 I do consider it a character trait. It’s part of me. 🙂

      It’s the freckles and acne scars and discoloration, la. I think it’s also the fact that I’ve tried so much and always seem to end up in the same boat. Of course, that’s not entirely true– giving up chocolate fixed my acne, giving up sugar tightened my pores… maybe I’m getting somewhere.

      But of course it really is mostly in my head. I told Dave I was writing about problems with my skin and he said, “why, what’s wrong with it?” as if there isn’t always something wrong with it. 🙂

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      1. Most of my scars are from my brother as well, so I can relate to that. 🙂

        By the way, you taught me a new word. I somehow managed to go my entire life without knowing that a jeweler’s glass was called a loupe. Trust me, if I posted a high resolution close-up picture of my face, you’d see all of it. I’m pretty bumpyl.

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  7. My skin has always been an issue with me as well. Not to the degree you describe, more like “If there was one thing you can change about yourself, what would it be?”, my answer would invariably be “my skin!”

    And yeah it does sound silly to complain about such a seemingly insignificant thing, but it’s all relative. You feel the way you feel about it, there’s no judgment. You’ll feel the way you feel about yourself until you don’t. I think removing the guilt is the first step; don’t feel bad about feeling bad about your skin haha 🙂 We all have something!

    I have some hair issues too, getting a good hair day AND a good skin day? Yeah, tricky lol 😉

    Thanks for sharing Rara, I know this must have been challenging to write about. For what it’s worth I think your skin looks just fine, and I’ve never judged a friend or lover by their complexion 🙂

    Rohan.

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    1. I think complexion is probably the first thing I notice. I have a friend who is a curvy plus size and she’ll always notice weight before anything else. It’s her thing. We’ll go somewhere and get stuck in conversation circles when I say, “The girl with the amazing skin like you?” and she says “The only one at the party slimmer than you!” and it takes us another 10 minutes to figure out if we’re talking about the same person. I just don’t see weight or hair. She just doesn’t see skin. We really need to start getting names, haha. 😉

      My hair is a mess, usually, but I also spend less than 2 minutes a day on it, so I figure it’s rebelling. 🙂 My weight does what it wants, but so long as I can do my yoga and pick up my cats and dance with my husband, it’s all good.

      I like your perspective. My goal will be to stop feeling bad about feeling about about my skin, haha. That’s achievable, I can sense it!

      *hugs* Thanks for your insights, empathy, and balance, Rohan! 🙂

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  8. I loved your line, ‘so much for the silence of a mind at peace’. Like Rohan above said, we all have something. Thankfully, the older I get the less anxiety I feel about my body/hair/skin issues. I’m even starting to welcome the gray hairs and wrinkles, sags and bags. It’s very freeing to focus more on the love I feel for my family, friends and try to truly enjoy the moment.

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    1. Thank you!

      I’ve been strangely fond of the wrinkles, myself. 🙂 I know that sounds batty coming from someone who just wrote 700 words about her own face, but there you have it. I like aging though. It seems to soften me….

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  9. People are so freakin’ rude. You are beautiful – but you have to accept yourself – I know that for every 100 compliments I might get – one non-compliment will stick out like a horse in a room full of kittens. It’s a hard road to love one’s self – but I think it’s worth it to try.

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    1. It’s a weird thing how contrary I can be. I really do think I’m pretty, I just have bad skin. I know those don’t sound like they go together… but my brain believes both to be totally factual. 🙂 Of course, just to further show off my contrariness, haha– I had a friend who offered his plastic surgery service for my larger scars.. and I couldn’t go through with it. These scars are part of my history. I’m a strange girl… so often like a horse in a roomful of kittens. 😉

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  10. I know I am going to get flak for this one – basic biology, the skin is an organ that outwardly reflects what is going on inside – you’ve already figured that out! At the risk of sounding like someone’s old mother (which I am) the following really do a world of good, not only for your skin but your brain too: juice fasts (don’t laugh), way less meat, be an every other day or weekday vegetarian, go vegan if things like gluten and dairy are ruining your life (because of chemistry and not because they come from cute animals), drink lots of water and less alcohol, sleep more, don’t smoke… It may sound joyless but it’s not – in the meantime you sound like you are dealing with it!

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    1. There’s no flak given on this here blog, haha. 🙂 Good-hearted advice is always welcome. Plus, what’s the point of being connected with the whole world if you don’t hear the things they say? 🙂

      I sleep plenty… in that I rarely am tired. It’s less hours than most people, but anymore than 4-5 hours and I feel awful the next day. I don’t drink, smoke, drink dairy, eat sugar, or consume chocolate in any form. I drink a ton of water. I was a vegetarian for other reasons for 2 years and my skin was the worst ever… it was a big reason that I went back to meat consumption. I don’t do juice fasts because I don’t eat sugar (including fruit sugars, except in very small supply). The no sugar thing has been super amazing for my skin as far as minimizing breakouts and evening pore sizes. Now if I could just figure out the toning. *sighs*

      But yes, I’m dealing with it, slowly but surely. 😀

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      1. Looks like you’ve got a handle on what does and doesn’t work for you! Have you looked into IPL laser treatment? I had it done for sun damage and the results were incredible!

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  11. People can be so rude! Is anyone’s skin tone actually truly “even”? Mine isn’t. This was a beautifully honest post Rara. Silly tricks of the mind cause a lot of “body image” issues for a large number of us.

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    1. Yep, that’s the problem with having an over-active mind, right? 🙂 I guess I’d rather have an over-active mind and body issues than whatever the opposite of that is, 😉 😀

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  12. Was covered in freckles growing up. And now I’m covered in moles. Good times. Every so often I got to a dermatologist just to make sure I’m “okay” and they usually want to remove on here, take a sample of another one there, and “oh my goodness, how long have you had that one?!” Also, good times. So far every test has come back clean. But… I can understand how skin could be the chink in someone’s armor.

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    1. I know! I’m lucky to not have any “oh! how long has that…” spots… that would probably turn me into a mess. Thanks for sharing your skin-angst, too. 🙂 It makes me feel a little less crazy town. 😀

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  13. I find you absolutely lovely in your photo. Not that my opinion matters, but it speaks to something a very smart friend of mine said recently. We all tend to be so much harder on flaws we find in ourselves, when for our loved ones (or even strangers) we would overlook those flaws or actually find them beautiful.

    I read a study about body size recently that said when we see a certain body type more frequently, we become much less judgmental of it. I feel like the same would be true if there were more models shown with imperfect, non-Photoshopped skin. I used to adore magazines with sections showing stars without makeup who had noticeable acne – not because I thought the celebrities deserved to be shamed, but because it at least made me feel like they shared some of my imperfections.

    I only link because it truly ties in to what you’re writing about – this is a project I did with my community where we tried to represent the diversity of beauty that’s not currently shown in the media. There are lots of photos and really brilliant quotes from people about what beauty means to them: http://jenniesaia.wordpress.com/2013/06/06/beauty-is-truth-truth-beauty-the-model-community-look-book/

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    1. Thank you, Jennie! 🙂 It’s true that our flaws are mostly of our own keeping– no one necessarily agrees.

      I agree with you about the availability of information too. I fell in love with the actress Emma Stone when I heard her go on a skin-obsessed rant, too. I don’t think I had ever heard anyone with beautiful skin talk about struggles with their skin ever before.

      I used to do the photoshopping for magazines and such. Mostly they used small models because their samples were always so tiny (size 4 shoes, etc), but I remember how appalled they’d be about skin. Maybe all that judgement settled into my mind somewhere!

      You’re always welcome to attach links, Jennie, even if it only somewhat kinda sorta relates, haha. I clicked through the photos this morning– beautiful! 🙂

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  14. Occupying your own skin with joy,
    I watch you
    listen to yourself living,
    discovering each day
    how much less of everything
    steadies you into being.
    – Terrance Keenan

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  15. We look at ourselves with a critics eye all the time. For me it’s my ‘vertical challenged’ self. I’m short. Always was and I hate it. There is always something to keep us down and worried. But as I age, I have come to accept myself more. I am me. You are you. We are beautiful in our way. You have a wonderful, creative, challenging mind. So do I. I will take that over looks anyday. You can have flawless skin but have a very flawed and mottled heart. I will take the opposite. A flawless heart and flawed skin. You are beautiful where it counts the most my rara friend. Inside where it shines outward like a beacon.

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  16. You’re a Monet even close up with the interesting brush strokes. The first thing I was was the photos of a striking, beautiful young woman.

    My teen daughter (who is feeling the pressure to be perfect) and I were just talking this morning about people with no filters. Ugh. Forget them.

    Wonderful post. Thank for for sharing your experiences and inspiring.

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    1. Awww, thanks, Juliette! Luckily, my brain somehow separates “skin issues” from “beauty issues”. I think that’s a consequence of surrounding myself with people who think I;m pretty, haha! I can say “I am beautiful and I have awful skin” in the same sentence, and mean both equally. ‘Tis so complex.

      The funny thing about the lady is that she could have said anything else and I would have just been amused by her. Weight, smell, hair, clothing style– bring it. People without a filter always seem to pick just the right thing to say to get under your proverbial skin! 🙂

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  17. Wow. I inspired Rara!

    I’m sorry that you can relate. I think every woman can to some extent. We all have something we hate about ourselves. I’m glad you were able to share though! I’m sure it wasn’t easy. Good for you!

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    1. 🙂 You do so often! I’m afraid that men probably can relate, too– though maybe less to weight-issues. I’ve actually found more equally-skin-obsessed people in the male arena than female.

      I try to think of it as the negative side of a trait I appreciate– my desire for things to be the very best they can be. It’s still embarrassing, though. I mean, “it’s just skin!” 🙂

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      1. Oh, yes. I didn’t mean to imply that men can’t relate.

        It is embarrassing, but that doesn’t mean it’s insignificant. Good for you for talking about it. It’s not easy to do because talking shines a spotlight on it.

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  18. I only have good advice. Both my sister and I have freckles, and pimples, we’ve accepted our skin. Dark brown hair, blue/green eyed Irish lassies. The look I’ve heard referred to is “Black Irish”. We’ve learned a trick for blotchy skin. Wash your face with water only, sometimes wash it with soap. And use a good moisturizer. Then use some sort of mineral base foundation. Mascara, wee wee little blush. That’s it. You can do whatever else you want from that. Takes like 5 minutes. Fresh, and clean and no crap, so it lets your skin breath. Spend your money on what you keep on your face, not what you wash off. Anything can do that…I mean your skins not a plate…its vellum. 😉

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    1. Love the advice! It’s what seems to work best for me, actually… despite all the fancy soaps I’ve tried. I like my own face washes from honey or coffee if I have the time and feel like it needs an extra scrub. I’ve always been a minimalist when it comes to makeup, too– I’m too worried about what’s underneath to risk covering it up with a product, 🙂 I’m glad to know I’m not off the deep-end when it comes to the “right” thing to do. 😀

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  19. When I was at my heaviest, I had issues with my skin, and I think that was worse than any amount of weight gain. I hated that if I wanted to “hide” my acne I had to wear makeup or take pills for it. Skin issues can be huge–I’m glad mine kind of resolved themselves.

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    1. It was the same for me– the only part of being heavier that I didn’t like was my skin.

      In fact, giving up sugar has been nothing but good for my skin. I look at that picture above and though I can still see scars and wrinkles and dark lines… man, it’s a million times better than a picture of Rara-on-sugar. It’s not quite what I want to see, but I know enough about how bad skin can get to be totally and utterly grateful for it. 🙂

      I’m so glad for you that your skin issues resolved, I know how consuming they can be. Your skin always glows in your photos, it’s awesome!

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  20. You are very beautiful and you have a very beautiful mind. 🙂 I don’t like to preach but just want to suggest as a friend. I had acne issue ( and bad hair..and I was not at all serious about how I looked! 😦 ) for two years. I was working 15 hours a day that time and also turned vegetarian. I had certain vitamin deficiencies. I had to fix them by taking supplements. 8 hours sleep was advised by my doctor . I stopped caffeine..drank green and black tea, drank water and tender coconut water. And my grand ma asked me to follow once a week sandalwood powder face mask routine. All of them worked. 🙂 Love & hugs

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      1. Rara, you can find them in Indian grocery stores . But , its better if you can buy a piece of sandal wood and make the mask ( in that way, it will be purely natural and chemical free) . I am sure many hindu temples sell sandal woods.

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  21. You are a beautiful soul with a beautiful mind Rara. BTW~ you have the most beautiful eyes.! Take heart in knowing we all have things we dislike about ourselves physically and they appear worse and larger in our own minds and our people that love us don’t even see the physical flaws after a while that become our own nasty monsters . I have this funny crooked smile that I hate,really hate, and I swear it has held me back in so many ways throughout my life because I let it. Their are certain words I won’t even say because they emphasize the way my mouth goes. I try to make peace with that ‘hate’ until someone points it out and then I have to start all over again peacemaking with my self. Maybe if people put more importance on the inside of how people look rather than the outside there would be a lot less pressure to live up to certain standards. Rawr on Rara and thank you for sharing your heart with us, your beautiful coffee coloured heart. ❤

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  22. I realized post-posting that that sounded all cheery. What I really mean is that you’ve beautifully captured something that while negative in tone is very beautiful and I cannot add anything, but wanted to express appreciation. Not to just sound like OMG LOL FAVE. >.<

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  23. The first thing I ever loved about my husband is his beautiful skin, flawless, soft, brown skin. Like silk to the touch. I had beautiful skin as a teenage when all the other girls were dealing with zits and angst. So ironic because now, the beautiful skin is a dry, flaky,scarred mess. Surprisingly, people love us anyway. I find that enormously comforting. You should too.

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  24. I used to worry about my appearance, Then, I realized that it really doesn’t matter all that much. As long as my wife thinks I look good, that’s all I really care about. When she stops thinking I look good, I’ll start worrying about it again.

    By the way, you look great, my dinosaur friend.

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    1. Aww, thanks Revis– and good advice, too. 😀 I try to remember that Dave doesn’t even notice my flawed skin, and that it doesn’t really matter… but sometimes, sometimes I just forget. 🙂

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    1. 🙂 It’s pretty awesome, and luckily, a gift the universe has sent my way most of my life. I always seem to be surrounded by loving, talented people. I do know that I’m loved, and I do feel pretty… but for some reason, I can believe all that and still be sad about my skin.

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  25. Goodness – I feel you on this. These past few years have been not so nice to my skin thanks to hormonal changes. I prefer not to wear make-up. But – some days – are not so nice & I try to touch up the spots I want to hide. I think the “damage” is more in our heads than anywhere else though.
    BTW – not just saying this. But – you are beautiful!

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  26. Although I have nice skin, I still have a thing about it. I envy you your brown skin against my fish belly white skin & a slight tan can be dangerous to one’s health. You are beautiful Rawr!

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    1. Thank you, 🙂 My mom always says that we want the things we don’t have. Girls with straight hair want curly, curly haired girls want straight hair, etc. It took me awhile to come to terms with my brown skin… but I did. I hope the same happens with all the other skin issues I have in my own mind. 🙂

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  27. I think you’re beautiful and have always believed that what’s inside someone is far more important than how they look because looks fade over the years but internal beauty grows forever. I have translucent blue/white skin with lots of flaws, freckles in patches, uneven tone and more. I will never be a supermodel but I try to be a decent person and in the end I think that’s what counts 🙂

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  28. Oh Rara, you are beautiful, skin & all. I have a bajillion scars too & often got teased for being “too pale”. “OMG are you a goth?!” <~ That one was my favorite. It was said in a derogatory way as if being "goth" is a bad thing.
    Anyway, NONE of us are perfect & I know you know this, sometimes we need to hear it, though.
    xoxox

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    1. Thank you, lovely! 🙂 Skin is such a tricky thing. I think I just get frustrated with it because I try so hard to make it perfect. (And, haha, I laughed at the “are you a goth?” reasoning… 😀 People are silly sometimes!!)

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  29. Woooo look at all of us and our skin issues!
    I had bad skin from age 12, kept telling myself it wasn’t as noticeable as I thought, then was totally humiliated age about 16 when I went to the doctor for some other reason and he went ‘never mind that, what are we going to do about your skin, I hate to see a pretty girl with a face full of spots’ then put me on long term antibiotics which caused various other problems.
    Skin went on nasty till my mid 20s then a short respite before I got purple bags under my eyes…then rosacea. AND YET…it’s amazing how often I’ve been told not only that I’m beautiful but that my skin is – luminous, translucent, whatever. I can see all the damage but these days I realise it can’t be that obvious to others…And I’m just glad to be healthy (though I’d still like to kick the sugar habit. Not that I’m pressuring you about that draft post or anything 🙂 )

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    1. I know it! It makes me feel a little better though, like everyone in the world didn’t just wake up with great skin. 🙂

      Haha, the draft post went crazy out of control. It’s like 9 posts worth of information now. I sent it all off to the husband because he’s good about taking out my nonsense and trimming content down… and also saying, “You missed this really important piece.” We’ll see how it all comes out! 😀

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  30. I so understand this post!!! I have a variety of bumps and spots that are appearing as I get older (perish the thought) and it is becoming kind of an obsession with me to cover them up. For awhile I had a teeeeeny tiny wart growing on the end of my nose and all i could think of was that I was becoming a witch or something but thankfully—it disappeared before it went into full bloom. Whew. You are beautiful. You really are. What matters is not our skin and outward appearance as you well know. It is hard to remember that sometimes when others have more perfect skin and faces but doggone it—–we have more depth than just shallow looks. 🙂 Great post as always. And so many comments. No wonder.

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    1. Skin can be so exhausting… 🙂 I can’t imagine the wart scenario– I’d probably have been up all night worrying about it… or worrying about worrying about it, haha. Yes, I think more people than I realized identify with skin concerns! That’s good to know… though you’re right. Now I just want a sign to tell people that we “have more depth than just shallow looks”– beautifully said! 🙂

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  31. Wow do I understand this. I am ghostly white, except for my cheeks. They were bright red as a kid and I had red spots on my cheeks. I finally evened out, got cute even for a bit. Then after the first doese of a chemo drug called Adriamycin, I developed rosacea. So now throughout the day my nose turns bright red, my eyelids burn and I get a red band across my cheeks. For HOURS. Eventually most of it will go away only to return again But my nose is now always light pink. So I am giving up and going to a Derm doode. After all, a red splotchy nose is as distressing and distracting to others as it is to me.

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    1. Awww, I’m sorry you have to deal with skin angst, too! *hugs* You should read the comments above if you’re ever feeling down– apparently everyone is so distracted by awesomeness that they don’t see skin! So the best cure for skin? Be awesome. 😀 You’re already there! 🙂

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      1. Meds are a close second. I am going to see a dermatologist. Interesting though–I haven’t been able to eat much, or at all for a period of time and both the rosacea and my bipolar symptoms almost completely disappeared. Hmmm….food for thought.

        Like

  32. I always tell people I didn’t got mixed well. My mom is white and my Dad is brown but has Vitiligo and another skin condition that causes discoloring of arm and legs. Can’t do much about the spots without pigment (except for making ridiculous stories when I was a kid.. I think I even tried to make my classmates believe that a lonely little cloud had escaped from the sky and landed on my collarbone! ) or the discolored patches. The one thing that always relieved my skin and doesn’t make me breakout is homemade wet processed coconut oil (it has some antifungal/bacterial and antiviral properties).

    Your post reminded me a bit of Seal… I always thought his scars were gorgeous. The perfect imperfection.

    Anyways. I think your gorgeous. in fact.. I feel like proposing to you all over again! 😀

    Like

    1. Oh, you must have been the most darling child in all the world. 🙂 I love the cloud story… it fits so perfectly with the image of the girl eating out of a Nutella can, haha. 😀

      “The perfect imperfection” is a beautiful turn of phrase. 😀 And thank you for your compliment, it means a lot coming from a gorgeous girl like you! 🙂

      Like

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