challenge accepted! health

Spilled Milk and Sweet Horrors

Am I being threatened?

It wasn’t the words, but the tone and body language that made me ask.

I was shocked, standing still in a puddle of milk– relatively new to marriage, but no stranger to bullies.  I felt my face turn fierce.

Years of self-defense training reassured my mind.  He was blocking the exit to the kitchen, and he was bigger– but I had knives.  I was mentally packing my bags when empathy and reason sneaked past fear.

The light had been hurting his eyes and he’d been getting confused lately.   The day before, I found him crouched in a corner, afraid.  The day before that, he ran our car into the side of the garage– the first accident of his life as a driver.

Something was wrong.  I calmed my nerves enough to consider what I knew to be true about my husband of two years.

He wasn’t a threat.

I repeated that truth as I scooted my way towards him.  It was a tiny kitchen– in a stereotypical first apartment– but I took my time.   Carefully, as if approaching a rabid dog, I put my hand on his head.  He was hot– too hot– and clammy.  Three or four strands of his hair were on my hand when I looked down.

“Did you cut yourself when you dropped the bowl, Rara?” he asked softly, as if the moment before didn’t happen, worryingly reviewing every one of my fingers.  He cleaned up the glass and milk– silently and with total competence, just like normal.

“You called me stupid.” I whispered sadly.  Then, defiantly, for no reason at all, I added, “And I think your hair is falling out.”

He mumbled, confused again,  “I don’t know what I said.  Maybe we should go to the doctor.”

When we arrived, the nurse asked why we were there.

Stoically, without looking in my direction, Dave told her,  “My hair is falling out, and I think something is wrong with my brain.”

I took his hand, shaking.  He hadn’t told me that something might be wrong with his mind.

“I’m sure it’s nothing,” the nurse said soothingly.

It wasn’t nothing.  It was diabetes and it was raging out of control.

The symptoms were explained away as sugar’s ability to change brain chemistry.  What sugar can do to you and how it changes your brain– even if you’re not diabetic– is barely starting to be exposed.  I just happened to bear witness to what would make a great case study.

I don’t like talking about the tone and words that pushed us to the Urgent Care, because it makes Dave sound like a man on the brink of anger.   People always think the quiet ones are angry and that sugar is harmless, so it’s like one little knight defending two sides of a castle at once.

When people asked what symptoms Dave experienced that caused me to give up sugar too, I leave out the bone-chilling truth that sugar tampers with your mind’s ability to process information.  I leave out the exhaustion it creates and the debilitating fear that it pushes through your veins.

Instead I tell people that we gave up sugar when he started losing his hair, because it’s an easier and more effective argument.

Most people don’t care about their brain, but no one wants to go bald.

__________________________________________

Are you afraid of baldness?

… and yes, I did write this post only after writing several about Dave’s true nature (here, here, and here) because of how people so often react to stories from his month of illness, no matter how much I edit them down.

– Wow! Thanks for the love guys:

121 comments

  1. I love the way you have written this: it is taut and tender, stark and sympathetic – and, to one who had an insulin dependant diabetic father, eminently believable and sad. You have expressed the appalling effects of sugar so well. Thank you for sharing something so painful in such a beautiful and, ultimately, life-affirming way. Alienora

    Like

    1. Yeah, it was trippy. It was like that moment when you’re by yourself in a dark room, and you feel like something is in the corner even if it’s not– it’s your emotions and your brain at war. But of course, we’ve been alright with sugar (with the exception of a few notable ups and downs) for the last 5 years, 🙂 so we worked it out!

      Like

  2. Diabetes runs in my family. It’s an ugly, insidious disease with so many symptoms that wouldn’t suggest to most people blood sugar as the culprit. I can attest how blood sugar up or down, can make you crazy. It can put you in a coma, turn you blind, kill you by pieces. I wonder how many people know how dangerous it is? Thanks for the reminder!

    Like

    1. The sheer amount of symptoms STILL surprises me. So many of them have to do with sugar in general, not just diabetes. When I was typing this, I was trying to remember the last time I just dropped a bowl full of food in the way that I used to– and I just don’t remember. A month or so before I quit sugar, I think. That type of klutziness went away with the sugar, thank goodness. 🙂

      Like

    1. Thank you, our choice to give up sugar has caused a lot of headache in it’s own right, but I don’t regret it. I think back to this moment, and I know we made the right choice. All the good stuff that came with it (like weight loss and balance) helps too! 🙂

      Like

  3. How scary. Isn’t amazing(in a not-good way) how something like diabetes can have such an impact on so many things? Personality, hair, vision, nerves, etc.

    I am glad you were able to see the bigger picture and help him get the treatment he needed. He is very lucky to have you, and I know you feel the same way about him. 🙂

    Like

  4. That was beautifully written.
    I’m not afraid of baldness 🙂 but I am terribly afraid of something going wrong with my brain. It’s all I have.
    I don’t avoid all sugar (I just finished a slice of gateau) but I don’t eat that much of it – none in my coffee, sugar-free drinks, very few cakes etc.

    Like

    1. Thanks, Drali– I’m like you. I’d take baldness over brain problems ANY day. Restricted sugar is a good call, 🙂 I gave it up entirely and don’t miss it anymore– and now when I accidentally have some, I feel all the affects like I accidentally took a drug. Just yesterday (maybe the day before) I had a cookie that was supposed to be sugar free and wasn’t… and bleh, I’ve been groggy, edgy, and useless for what seems like days. On the bright side, it serves as a reminder that I don’t need it, haha, 😀

      Like

    1. It is a scary thing, I hope your nephew fights it head on! 🙂 It’s a fight worth fighting. This story was 5 years ago and things are under control now, so most days, I feel like we won! 🙂 Meow!

      Like

  5. Well written. I was a nurse and very occasionally met someone having a “Dave moment”. One day later they were the gentlemen that was their true nature.
    My own husband went through many years of sleepwalking. By day he would not even use bad language, but when he was sleepwalking and talking he was such a different person. Thankfully after about ten years he grew out of it. ( I hope I haven’t jinxed it now!)

    Like

    1. Oh yes, none of the nurses seemed surprised when I told them about his other symptoms. When they met him, he was in the exhausted mode, and that didn’t surprise them either. (I’m sure not if you CAN surprise a nurse, 😉 )

      Sleepwalking! That must’ve been stressful for you– I’m glad he grew out of it, too, *knock on wood* 🙂

      Like

  6. How scary for you both. This was wonderfully written and I’m glad Dave received the treatment he needed. We gave up sugar too, when several different people in my family tree were diagnosed with diabetes.

    Like

    1. Yep, poor Dave was terrified through it all, though I’m sure he wouldn’t use that word himself. 😉 🙂 I don’t miss sugar anymore, and the diabetes is under control, so I think it all worked out, in the end! 🙂

      Like

      1. We called the police on him. He was belligerent and verbally abusing me and another manager. The cop showed up, talked to him for a few seconds, and then got him an orange juice. A couple minutes later that guy was fine. I was dumbfounded.

        Like

    1. Oh yes, for years and years now, we’ve been on a more even keel. There’s always a hiccup, here or there, but mostly our new sugar-free life allows things to run smoothly. 🙂 Thanks for reading!!

      Like

    1. Dave’s depression played havoc with his diabetes, and vice versa. To this day, it still does…. even though we’re sugar free. It felt like dealing with two diseases no one really knows anything about… frustrating! But it made me determined to figure it out for us, and for the most part– we did figure it out. I’m hoping your brother does, too.

      Like

      1. I know I have a sugar addiction and I can’t imagine how you managed to break it. I’m not sure I ever could. Growing up I had less sugar usually because my brother could not have any. But then I got away and sweet tooth ahoy!

        My counselor said that sugar contains a certain about of serotonin, which is one reason we reach for it when depressed. But it’s not a good solution because of that inevitable crash. But If I deny myself sugar, I seem to crave it all the more. Not sure what to do there.

        Like

        1. It’s like any drug. You fight it with either cold turkey, supplementing, or weaning. Sometimes, all three.

          The first step was identifying everything that has sugar in it, or that converts to sugar (because if it converts to sugar in your stomach, you’re still feeding the addiction). Then, I just eliminated the stuff that I didn’t really care about– going as far as cleaning out the panty and giving or throwing it away. Then I weaned off the stuff I didn’t think I could live without– in my case, that was CocaCola. I cut my intake a little bit, every day, until I was down to none. Then, the stuff I was partial to, and sad about losing, but not insane about– like pie– I found alternatives to. Like sugar-free pie. 🙂

          I think when you deny it to yourself, it eats at you… so it’s best just to focus on less, not none.

          Okay, that was confusing,but I hope it helps somewhat! 🙂

          Like

  7. lovely post, as always, about a chilling event. sugar is something we really need to work on cutting back around here.

    when i clicked on the links to the posts on dave’s true nature, i really expected to go back to the post about how he is saving the future from time travel. unless that post has disappeared…

    Like

    1. Haha! 🙂 I almost linked to it, but then I couldn’t decide if his human-clone-ness was a positive post about his nature or not— after all, he is thwarting progressive scientific research, 😉

      Thank you for reading! 😀

      Like

  8. I always warn my other half about this. I’m going to read this to him later tonight. He has a lot in common with Dave. & He NEEDS to kick the sugar habit.
    & I’m being nice by saying habit. It’s more like a life-controlling addiction.
    Sigh.
    Thank you for sharing this, Rara. I know it’s touchy & personal. *hugs*

    Like

    1. Research has determined that sugar has the same affect on your brain as drugs, so calling it an addiction is pretty accurate. 🙂 Thanks for being such a gentle reader, 😀 *hugs*

      Like

  9. I had no idea that sugar could have such a detrimental effect on your brain. That must have been scary for both of you. And I agree, I would stick with the bald story because it’s easier to explain.

    Like

    1. Oh yes, it’s basically the same change as a drug– especially in the quantities most people eat it. 🙂 Truthfully, I also like giving the “bald” story answer… it creates such funny ripples in conversation. 😀 Thanks for reading, Dorothy!

      Like

  10. Before I was diagnosed with diabeties I would lose my temper over nothing. Really. Nothing. I would throw things even. I scared myself. Then I got a really bad infection and literally overnight became a full blown diabetic. My doctor says they are just now finding out some diabetics start out with a bad infection. There is still so little for sure known facts about the disease. Now if my sugar is too high I find myself angry, too low I act like I’m drunk people say. Doesn’t happen too often to me now because I’m careful what I eat. I can empathize with you and especially with Dave.

    Like

    1. When the doctor said Dave had diabetes, I asked how he got it. (Dave’s never had a huge sweet tooth)… and the doctor listed 10 possibilities, and then rattled off 20 other things that he was pretty sure could causes diabetes. There’s so little information, which is why when I do give to diabetes causes, I try to give to the research groups! I’m glad your blood sugar is under control now– I know that those moments can be just as scary for the diabetic as they are for the watchers. *hugs*

      Like

  11. this was such an intriguing, engaging read. i’m glad you’ve dealt with the issue. i am bummed about what you’ve said about sugar. it’s in blood. now you’ve made me think. damn, i hate thinking!

    Like

    1. Haha, sorry for the thinking!! 🙂 When Dave’s blood sugar was taken, his blood sugar was so off balance that he had to squeeze his finger to get blood out– it was like a drop of syrup on his hand. Of course, his blood sugar levels were about at 600 (versus the 99 or so that most people hover around). It’s a weird mental image that has stuck with me over the years! 🙂

      Like

  12. Sugar is definitely NOT harmless. It controlled my mind and mood for many years. And it was an addiction. I remember the uncontrollable urge to mix up some butter and powdered sugar (cake icing) and eat it. It gave me the high I needed to get by, but it was destroying me little by little. The shaking was very bad. Now I get my sweet from Stevia or fruit. Real food tastes better when I’m not hooked on sugar. I still have a sugar dessert now and then (especially if it’s chocolate) if we go out to eat, but I know to be ready for a reaction (depression, usually) and I almost always regret it. Why are we so stubborn? Luckily I have not dropped into diabetes, although I know it’s lurking around the next sugar corner for me. Kudos to you for bringing this subject into the light.

    Like

    1. The addiction part was a hard thing to fess up to. I loved sugar, and though I’d happily admit my coffee was an addiction… I didn’t want to admit that sugar was an addiction, too.

      My last few days, I’ve been sick from sugar I accidentally ate– and just felt slow, and lethargic, grumpy, and confused. It makes me thankful that I gave this stuff up! 🙂 Kudos to you for doing the same– I know it’s not easy.

      Like

      1. Society does not admit that sugar is an addiction. I think that’s why it’s so hard for us to admit it. And the slow, lethargic, etc. part—I can definitely relate. It’s actually a silent epidemic, and I believe that some anti-social behavior can be attributed to sugar consumption. It throws our bodies and our minds out of whack.

        Like

  13. This was written with such love and understanding. It was gripping and frightening as well, and I was so relieved that it was a beast of an issue that could be tamed. I also suppose I should rethink my chocolately times!

    Like

    1. I am also so glad it was something fixable. Looking back, I’m not sure what would have happened if it turned out to be something else– like a tumor. I’m also glad that Dave was willing to tame it. So many of the people he met who were diagnosed with diabetes at the same time are either dead, amputated, or old beyond their years now– whereas, 5 years later, Dave looks/feels better than ever. Thank goodness he was willing to go with the crazy “lets give up sugar” plan!!

      Like

  14. I know kids have gone funny after lots of sugar but I had no idea about any of the effect.
    This story is related in a admiral fashion, with passion, understanding and without flipping out. Must have been a hard time for you both. I’m glad you’ve got to the root of the problem. Scary.

    Like

    1. Luckily, I’m not a flipper-outter, 🙂 I think if I was, this story would be much different. I’m also so glad we figured it out! 😀

      New research shows that sugar is as addicted as cocaine, and the withdrawal symptoms are similar. The ups and downs with withdrawal symptoms are what causes all the weirdness in the brain– many of which can be permanent. I’m so protective of my brain– like Drali said above, it’s all I got! 😀

      Like

  15. I’m pretty sure I know exactly how he felt. I broke down sobbing once in a meeting (many years ago) because I couldn’t track all the conversation in the room. I’d had several surgeries that year and thought that I had been brain damaged by all the anesthesia. I wasn’t happy to find out that is was diabetes, and yet, I was glad that after getting treatment I still had all my faculties! I am so glad that you found out what was wrong and I hope he is doing well on his treatment.

    Like

    1. Aw, *hugs* I’m sorry for that moment, but I’m so glad it wasn’t brain damage and doubly glad that you were able to manage it. I know how scary those uncontrolled feelings and confusion can be– especially for someone who doesn’t spend a lot of time being confused. 🙂 I’m glad you’re doing better. Thanks for reading!

      Like

  16. That does sound scary. Good thing you guys went to a DR and they listened and found out what was wrong. It’s not nice when something so drastically changes someones behaviour and you don’t have an answer to the reason why.

    Like

    1. I’m glad we went to such a great doctor. He’s still my favorite, even though he’s a little harder with the truth than seems necessary in the moment. When I get home each time, though, I’m always glad someone cared enough to yell at me, haha, 🙂

      The mind tricks diabetes plays were similar to those of depression. I’m firmly against chemically induced mind tricks. 🙂

      Like

    1. Thank you, I’m so glad we figured it out, too! For the last 5 years, things have been much more… even keel! 🙂 Thanks for the compliment, and for reading! 😀

      Like

  17. I married a type I diabetic. If the sugar goes down I can tell – his mood changes. Basically – he appears like a rude drunkard. I don’t even try to fight it. If he doesn’t take the juice I give him – I just call 911. The times I have – I’m glad that I did. Each of those times his sugars were below 50. The last time I called was less than a month ago – it was 27. Best to you & your husband living through diabetes. Hope his can be controlled better & doesn’t get worse.

    Like

    1. Smart! Yes, if they can’t help themselves at the moment, it’s better to get someone else involved. 27! Yikes, how frightening! Dave is prone to the other direction… when we went to the doctor, it was 600. They said he should’ve been in a coma.

      It’s been better since we gave up sugar, this story was 5 years ago and it’s well-managed naturally now, thank goodness! I’m wishing your husband well, Rosy, I know what a hard path it can be!

      Like

  18. Wow. I love me some sugar, but maybe I should think twice? 🙂 Seriously though, there is something delicately real about this that you worded so brilliantly! Well done.

    Like

    1. Sugar definitely messes with the mind, but it’s an odd thing to think about… most people, including myself before it all happened, see sugar like butter. Maybe not great for you, but certainly not harmful. I think part of it is that these stories about moods and personality shifts are so hard to tell. Thank you for reading, and for adding your voice to it. *hugs*

      Like

  19. Rara, keep ’em coming. You have a take and a presentation that captures attention and keeps me riveted. And, then I learn something as well. Blessings to you both. HuntMode

    Like

    1. It was pretty awful, but we figured it all out and came out the better for it, I think. 🙂 I’m so glad the writing worked out on this one, 😀 Thanks for reading!!

      Like

  20. Really scary; I don’t think there’s anything worse than not being able to trust your own brain – I don’t know if it’s worse for the person, or the people around them. Love your positive, practical, head-on attitude!

    Like

    1. I agree. I’m really partial to my brain. 😀 I think it’s definitely scarier for the one going through it… I know I would have been a mess, but Dave’s a trooper. Thanks for reading!!

      Like

    1. Next to the peeing-all-the-time, mood swings and confusion are two of the more recognizable diabetic symptoms. If your sugar drops too low, it’s like being drunk… if it goes to high, it’s like being on crack. It’s a crazy thing, but it’s also weirdly embarrassing to talk about which is probably why people don’t really recognize it as a common symptom. Thanks for reading! 🙂

      Like

  21. There have been a couple of times my blood sugar has dropped (usually because I’m so busy I forget to eat) and I feel awful. Just terrible. Of course, this is remedied by eating something, but I can’t imagine how truly out-of-control your poor hubby felt until he was diagnosed. Hugs for both of you…

    Like

    1. Yeah, when he was finally hooked up the IVs and they hydrated him and decreased the sugar in his blood… he was super tired. Exhausted from fighting it for a month! This was years ago, though, and since then, with giving up sugar, things have been stable and good. 🙂 *hugs* right back!

      Like

  22. Wow, how interesting. I had no idea that sugar was a culprit in this type of thing. Of course we always hear about how it makes kids hyper. I’m ticked at the nurse for telling you it was nothing. I’m glad you found out what it was and hope you’re both doing well now. I know I should cut down on my sugar and especially my gluten. It makes me feel tired and blah.

    Like

    1. I think she was trying to be helpful/soothing, though it probably just fed into Dave’s already existing confusion. I have so much more energy after giving up sugar… which is weird because I had no idea that it had any affect on my energy prior to Dave getting sick. But really, I didn’t know squat about nutrition– I had to do a lot of research, reading, and interviewing to figure it out. There’s something to be said for a crash course!

      Like

  23. Personally, I don’t care so much about losing my hair. I know it’s going to happen eventually. I’m glad that you got it figured out. I can’t imagine how scary it must be not feeling like yourself, and having no idea what might be causing it.
    When you really know someone, like you said, you know certain truths about them. a few stores about a hard time should change what you know.

    Like

    1. I’ve had my hair shaved for a medical procedure, so I’m pretty fearless about it, too. But my brain is important! 🙂 Yep, Dave is a pretty open book– if people know him at all, they know him well. When I told some of his friends the truth behind what sent us to the doctor, they were shocked… as shocked as I was. He’s a big guy, but like one hippie shopkeeper said, “His aura smells like cinnamon”. Little kids follow him around and strange animals sit and land on his lap… so fear is not something he normally inspires. Still, though, people are sensitive to the idea of a male causing a female fear… to the point of being slightly judgmental so I am wary before repeating a story that could be misunderstood.

      Like

        1. Yep, he’s a softie alright. It’s not easy being a guy. (Ha! I think I might be overly sensitive to the way the world restricts how men can feel and act because I have 3 brothers.)

          Like

    1. It’s about the chemicals it produces… chemicals mess with your brain, diabetic or not. It’s a scary thing. I’m overly protective of my brain, though, haha. 😀

      Like

  24. How fortunate to have discovered the cause of the mood shifts. Often times, problems go un (or mis) diagnosed for a long time. Thank you also for writing about it.

    Like

    1. Yes! I was glad that he was so quick to seek help, and that we had a doctor who figured out right away what it was– rather than dragging us through test after test. The nurse gave the doctor a hard time about doing blood sugar tests because Dave was so fit and lean, but sure enough… it was his blood sugar. We had a lot of luck on our side! 🙂

      Like

  25. With each word, I inched closer and closer to the computer screen. Could this be the Dave I thought I knew so well? Your line “empathy and reason sneaked past fear” had affected me by osmosis. (By the way, you just described perfectly how the Insula and Anterior Cingulate Cortex counter the Amygdala and Reptilian brain.) When the diabetes diagnosis appeared, I breathed peacefully again, yet with fascination that sugar could alter brain chemistry and thus action, personality, and life. Your last line had me laughing out loud.
    In short, you took me on a roller coaster ride of emotion with this post. You two are amazing. I love you both. {{{Hugs}}} Kozo

    Like

    1. Fear is one of my least favorite emotions to feel, and I have a pretty much 0 tolerance policy for those who cause it… which is lucky in our case. This was the moment that snapped us out of our “we’ll figure it out tomorrow” sense.

      You would have been shocked if you saw him during that month, though. He didn’t write or paint because he didn’t have the energy. We went to a small art show and he didn’t want to purchase any tiny piece, which he always insists on if he likes the art. To be honest, I’m not sure if he was even able to appreciate art. He didn’t remember anything. Dave is a flawless driver and the day he missed the garage by half a foot… he was nonchalant about it. Then the next morning, he didn’t remember what dented our garage or why our car was scratched… and couldn’t put the two together… which is weird because Dave is basically Sherlock Holmes about these things. Yes, he was so so different.

      But it was only a month, and his sugar was very bad– and the doctors explained that we see small affects of sugar on everyone every day. It just so happened that we were seeing a large effect in Dave. The other diabetics that we saw when figuring things out had the same story… how the full blown affects of sugar always manifested in the brain as confusion, hopelessness, disinterest, and a loss of compassion and context. It’s frightening to me because those are all on my list of least favorite things! 🙂

      *hugs* Thanks for reading and for always letting empathy and reason sneak though. 😀

      Like

  26. Wow, I’m sure it was so scary to have someone you knew so well all of sudden become someone else. The way you wrote this was so tender and sweet, it is easy to tell that the whole thing comes from a place of love.

    Like

    1. It was eerie. Like knowing two things at once, and having those things not match. Cognitive dissonance, I think it’s called. We’re back to normal, and have been for awhile, so that’s good too– we were lucky to figure it out so quickly, and I was lucky he was so dedicated to fixing it, and we were lucky to find such a great doctor. It’s a story of luck! 🙂

      Like

  27. This has a great flow. It’s so well crafted. You almost don’t even really notice that you don’t really give details of the actual actions that made you frightened. But it is loud and clear exactly how you felt in that moment. The immediate fear, the confusion, the disbelief, the caring, the love. All of those things present at once. Good job. And I’m glad you went to the doctor before anything progressed further.

    Like

    1. I don’t think Dave wanted to be alone with me if he couldn’t remember what he was doing from one minute to the next… I honestly think he was more afraid of it than I was. Which I can understand. I can’t imagine not trusting my own mind. People feel silly citing a personality shift as a reason to the see the doctor– I know we did– but it’s a pretty big and important sign. I hope maybe this post spreads awareness of that concept at the very least. 🙂

      Thank you for reading!

      Like

    1. Thank you, Kirsten! Yes, I’m so glad it wasn’t a tumor– at the time, we barely could afford fighting the diabetes, I can’t imagine having to wait to get tumor stuff done… we were lucky that everything worked out alright. 🙂 Thanks for reading!

      Like

    1. It’s such a complex disease, with so many symptoms– even now, 5 years later, it’s hard to remember to look at anything weird as a sign of something being off. *hugs* Thanks for reading!

      Like

        1. It’s good to keep an eye on it. The weird symptoms are the body’s way of telling you that something is wrong… and it’s awful when things get too bad to fix.

          Like

  28. Of all the great posts that I read at Yeah Write this week, this is the one that I dragged my wife to the computer to read. So powerful. I’m glad that you were able find your way through those scary times.

    Like

    1. Thank you, Ken– what a beautiful comment, especially since I know how awesome the other YeahWrite entries were, 🙂 I am glad we found our way, too. 🙂

      Like

    1. Oh yes, me too– I’m glad I didn’t have to drag him to the doctor, but I was prepared to do so if necessary! It was easier than he came willingly. 🙂 Thanks for reading!!

      Like

Rawr?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s